In many ways, the biggest winner in the deregulated environment was the air passenger. Although not exclusively attributable to deregulation, indeed the U.S. witnessed an explosive growth in demand for air travel. Many millions who had never or rarely flown before became regular fliers, even joining frequent flyer loyalty programs and receiving free flights and other benefits from their flying. New services and higher frequencies meant that business fliers could fly to another city, do business, and return the same day, from almost any point in the country. Air travel's advantages put long distance intercity railroad travel and bus lines under pressure, with most of the latter having withered away, whilst the former is still protected under nationalization through the continuing existence of Amtrak.
A complicating factor is that of origin-destination control ("O&D control"). Someone purchasing a ticket from Melbourne to Sydney (as an example) for A$200 is competing with someone else who wants to fly Melbourne to Los Angeles through Sydney on the same flight, and who is willing to pay A$1400. Should the airline prefer the $1400 passenger, or the $200 passenger plus a possible Sydney-Los Angeles passenger willing to pay $1300? Airlines have to make hundreds of thousands of similar pricing decisions daily.
Often the companies combine IT operations, or purchase fuel and aircraft as a bloc to achieve higher bargaining power. However, the alliances have been most successful at purchasing invisible supplies and services, such as fuel. Airlines usually prefer to purchase items visible to their passengers to differentiate themselves from local competitors. If an airline's main domestic competitor flies Boeing airliners, then the airline may prefer to use Airbus aircraft regardless of what the rest of the alliance chooses.
Those are 3 great islands. Corfu is much more green than Crete and Santorini and does have a different feel (more Italian but it’s no where near Turkey). The trouble with doing all 3 is that Corfu is on the opposite side of Greece from Crete and Santorini so you’d need to fly via Athens. It’s better for most people to visit another Cycladic island (Naxos, Paros, Milos, Folegandros) instead of splitting up their trip between the two sides of the country.

If you're wondering why this bountiful island (a two-hour ferry ride from Athens) isn't inundated with tourists, it's because the local ship-owners prefer to keep it quiet. They fraternise in country estates and neoclassical mansions in Hora. Floating on a slender peninsula, the stately capital is sprinkled with old-fashioned patisseries (Laskaris sells wonderful lemon-blossom preserves) and stylish boutiques (Waikiki Andros has gorgeous embroidered tunics and studded sandals). There's even a Museum of Contemporary Art, where the line-up might feature Man Ray or Miró.
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Of the above groups the Dodecanese probably constitute the best opportunity to mix islands between groups. You could, for example, take the Blue Star Ferries and map an island-hopping route that essentially heads in the same direction. In this way you could take in some of the Cyclades – Syros, Mykonos, Patmos, Naxos and some of the Dodecanese – Patmos, Leros, Kos, Chalki, and Rhodes – without any backtracking. Hellenic Seaways is another major ferry company whose routes you may want to explore.
Hi everyone.Went back home (seychelles)for 7 weeks,it was amazing!Just the island way of life(no stress),the weather,the families,creole food especially the fresh fish and of course the beautiful beaches with amazing sceneries.You need to get off the main road sometimes to see the secluded beaches,Some beaches can be seen while driving.My favourite is ANSE ROYALE where i grew up,ANSE PARNEL,PETITE ANSE,ANSE COPRA,ANSE TAKAMAKA,L’INTENDANCE,AND OF COURSE PORT LAUNAY.I also went on PRASLIN AND LA DIGUE ISLAND(WOW)it blew me away.I left seychelles at 17,missed so much,one thing for sure i will be back(hopefully for good one day)THANK YOU
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